Photo
Power on Flickr.Coal fire plant in Kingston, Tennessee. This was the site of the 2008 coal ash spill. It was built in 1955 and at the time was the largest coal-fired power plant in the world. The two chimneys are 1,000 feet tall.
Shot with a Polaroid One600 on first generation Impossible Project PX 600 Silver Shade

Power on Flickr.

Coal fire plant in Kingston, Tennessee. This was the site of the 2008 coal ash spill. It was built in 1955 and at the time was the largest coal-fired power plant in the world. The two chimneys are 1,000 feet tall.
Shot with a Polaroid One600 on first generation Impossible Project PX 600 Silver Shade

Photo
Degalvanized on Flickr.Tennessee Galvanizing plant, Jasper, TN
Zero Image 6x9, Kodak Portra 160

Degalvanized on Flickr.

Tennessee Galvanizing plant, Jasper, TN
Zero Image 6x9, Kodak Portra 160

Photo
Pinhole: Nashville Gravel Plant on Flickr.Zero Image 69, f235, Kodak Portra 160 converted to BW
Shot Feb. 2012 at the same time as this one:www.flickr.com/photos/37995657@N00/8498119346

Pinhole: Nashville Gravel Plant on Flickr.

Zero Image 69, f235, Kodak Portra 160 converted to BW
Shot Feb. 2012 at the same time as this one:
www.flickr.com/photos/37995657@N00/8498119346

Photo
Nashville Ready Mix on Flickr.Cropped slightly
“Meg” Diana F+, Kodak Portra 160

Nashville Ready Mix on Flickr.

Cropped slightly
“Meg” Diana F+, Kodak Portra 160

Photo
Pinhole: Bricked Double on Flickr.Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, each image about two seconds

Pinhole: Bricked Double on Flickr.

Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, each image about two seconds

Photo
Pinhole: Amoco on Flickr.The abandoned building I’ve been posting this week belongs to the same folks who own Kimbro Oil in Nashville. They’ve been around for years and supply local gas stations. I remember seeing their trucks when I was a kid. I’m very thankful they allowed me to explore the building and have offered to allow me back. I hope to shoot more when it gets much warmer…with the way the weather works in Nashville that could be sometime in the next 10 minutes.
Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Pinhole: Amoco on Flickr.

The abandoned building I’ve been posting this week belongs to the same folks who own Kimbro Oil in Nashville. They’ve been around for years and supply local gas stations. I remember seeing their trucks when I was a kid. I’m very thankful they allowed me to explore the building and have offered to allow me back. I hope to shoot more when it gets much warmer…with the way the weather works in Nashville that could be sometime in the next 10 minutes.

Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Photo
Pinhole: Mission Creep on Flickr.Abandoned building in Nashville (I’m still trying to find its history)
Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Pinhole: Mission Creep on Flickr.

Abandoned building in Nashville (I’m still trying to find its history)
Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Photo
Pinhole: As Big As You Want on Flickr.East side of an abandoned building in Nashville. I’m still trying to figure out for what it was originally built. I think I will need to do a bit of research at the library.
Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Pinhole: As Big As You Want on Flickr.

East side of an abandoned building in Nashville. I’m still trying to figure out for what it was originally built. I think I will need to do a bit of research at the library.
Zero Image 69, Kodak Portra 160, about four seconds

Photo
Pinhole: Never Learn on Flickr.I really need to learn that railroad tracks are rarely interesting no matter how much I think they “might be” in a pinhole.
Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, each image about 15 seconds

Pinhole: Never Learn on Flickr.

I really need to learn that railroad tracks are rarely interesting no matter how much I think they “might be” in a pinhole.

Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, each image about 15 seconds

Photo
Pinhole: Across the Spectrum on Flickr.Former U.S. Pipe and Wheland Foundry, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The site was abandoned eight years ago. I used the plant’s barbed wire fence for my (shaky) tripod. The image consists of two 6x12 images, one blurry the other not so bad, merged in PhotoShop. Since PS refused to see any connection (understandably so) I blended as best I could with my limited PS skills. 
Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, each image about 15 seconds

Pinhole: Across the Spectrum on Flickr.

Former U.S. Pipe and Wheland Foundry, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The site was abandoned eight years ago. I used the plant’s barbed wire fence for my (shaky) tripod. The image consists of two 6x12 images, one blurry the other not so bad, merged in PhotoShop. Since PS refused to see any connection (understandably so) I blended as best I could with my limited PS skills.

Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, each image about 15 seconds

Photo
Pinhole: Monkey Misdirection on Flickr.At the former U.S. Pipe and Wheland Foundry, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The site was abandoned eight years ago. 
Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, rain, clouds, crap weather, about 12 seconds

Pinhole: Monkey Misdirection on Flickr.

At the former U.S. Pipe and Wheland Foundry, in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The site was abandoned eight years ago.

Holga 120 WPC, f135, expired Kodak Portra 400VC, rain, clouds, crap weather, about 12 seconds

Photo
Nikkormat: Another Hydrant - Ever Feel Like You’re Drowning? on Flickr.Nikkormat, Nikon 24mm f/2.0s, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as positive and inverted in PS

Nikkormat: Another Hydrant - Ever Feel Like You’re Drowning? on Flickr.

Nikkormat, Nikon 24mm f/2.0s, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as positive and inverted in PS

Photo
Nikkormat: Unrestrained (Scanned as Negative) on Flickr.Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as negetives (which means they don’t need to be inverted). For consistency, I auto-corrected color and contrast and used the “lighter” setting in curves on each image layer using Photoshop.
I’m experimenting with cross process, or rather, how to scan cross processed film. I used to have the lab do my scans but it was getting too expensive. I purchased an Epson v500 second hand (the best photo purchase I’ve made in years). My first roll of cross process I scanned as positive and wondered the reds and pinks that denote typical “cross process” were missing. It wasn’t until my next film that I scanned as negative…and viola, the cross process look. That really started me thinking about what I knew about cross process and how to best approach each film (actually, each frame). 
It’s difficult to figure out how to scan to get the best final result. Scanning is a time consuming process so I really don’t want to scan everything twice just to figure it out. Hence, my tedious experiment (and its description here). I’m hope to find common markers or elements that clue me into how to best scan. So far, no luck. 
In the case of this triptych — all images that were well exposed in full sun — the negative scans were dark but the positive scans turned out well. I’ve had similar images where the negative scans were perfect but positive scans were dark. 
Arghhhh. I wonder if the length of the exposure affects anything. Do the longer exposures of pinhole do something to the film chemistry? If you have answers, please, please, clue me in :)

Nikkormat: Unrestrained (Scanned as Negative) on Flickr.

Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as negetives (which means they don’t need to be inverted). For consistency, I auto-corrected color and contrast and used the “lighter” setting in curves on each image layer using Photoshop.

I’m experimenting with cross process, or rather, how to scan cross processed film. I used to have the lab do my scans but it was getting too expensive. I purchased an Epson v500 second hand (the best photo purchase I’ve made in years). My first roll of cross process I scanned as positive and wondered the reds and pinks that denote typical “cross process” were missing. It wasn’t until my next film that I scanned as negative…and viola, the cross process look. That really started me thinking about what I knew about cross process and how to best approach each film (actually, each frame).

It’s difficult to figure out how to scan to get the best final result. Scanning is a time consuming process so I really don’t want to scan everything twice just to figure it out. Hence, my tedious experiment (and its description here). I’m hope to find common markers or elements that clue me into how to best scan. So far, no luck.

In the case of this triptych — all images that were well exposed in full sun — the negative scans were dark but the positive scans turned out well. I’ve had similar images where the negative scans were perfect but positive scans were dark.

Arghhhh. I wonder if the length of the exposure affects anything. Do the longer exposures of pinhole do something to the film chemistry? If you have answers, please, please, clue me in :)

Photo
Nikkormat: Confined Triptych on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive and inverted in PS

Nikkormat: Confined Triptych on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive and inverted in PS