Photo
Shelby Street Bridge on Flickr.Half dozen image stitch shot using Nikon D5000, 24mm f2.8 Nikkor-N (non-AI) on a sidewalk rail.

Shelby Street Bridge on Flickr.

Half dozen image stitch shot using Nikon D5000, 24mm f2.8 Nikkor-N (non-AI) on a sidewalk rail.

Photo
Hell Arrives on Flickr.Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikon Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative
I had some other shots that were deep red like this when I scanned at negatives. For the others I toned the red down. For this one I didn’t.

Hell Arrives on Flickr.

Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikon Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative
I had some other shots that were deep red like this when I scanned at negatives. For the others I toned the red down. For this one I didn’t.

Photo
Dog in the Water, Everybody Drink on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Nikkor-Q Auto 1:3.5 f=13.5cm
Film: Kodak Portra 160

Dog in the Water, Everybody Drink on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Nikkor-Q Auto 1:3.5 f=13.5cm
Film: Kodak Portra 160

Photo
Double Shot, Please on Flickr.Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikkor-Q Auto 1:3.5 f=13.5cm
Film: Kodak Gold 200
JFG is a coffee roaster. I remember the strong smell of roasting coffee every time I walked around the old city during my college days. I tried to find history of the company but didn’t have much luck. The electric sign was removed from its original location a few years ago and restored.

Double Shot, Please on Flickr.

Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikkor-Q Auto 1:3.5 f=13.5cm
Film: Kodak Gold 200

JFG is a coffee roaster. I remember the strong smell of roasting coffee every time I walked around the old city during my college days. I tried to find history of the company but didn’t have much luck. The electric sign was removed from its original location a few years ago and restored.

Photo
Fish on Flickr.Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens:  Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Gold 200

Fish on Flickr.

Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Gold 200

Photo
Still Life on Flickr.Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikon 24mm f/2.0s
Film: Kodak Gold 200
Antiques store in The Old City, Knoxville, Tennessee

Still Life on Flickr.

Camera: Nikkormat FTN
Lens: Nikon 24mm f/2.0s
Film: Kodak Gold 200
Antiques store in The Old City, Knoxville, Tennessee

Photo
Cherry Blossoms on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative.

Cherry Blossoms on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative.

Photo
The Girl Skimming Stones on Flickr.Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Portra 160
Exposure: 1/500th

The Girl Skimming Stones on Flickr.

Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Portra 160
Exposure: 1/500th


Photo
Lite Brite on Flickr.Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Portra 160
Exposure: About four minutes (guessed it and was slightly off)
Recently we went camping in Reliance on the banks of the the Hiwassee River. It’s quiet and at night it’s dark…except for this damn light on a vacation home across the river from where we stayed. I swear stadium lights produce less pollution than this thing. The frustrating part, nobody was home so the light wasn’t necessary (although it would aid anyone breaking in). The only positive I saw…was how it lit this tree.
I’m really wondering if I need to check my scanner settings. It seems I’m getting some seriously oversaturated colors. I had to desaturate this one in PS.

Lite Brite on Flickr.

Camera: Nikon F3
Lens: Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8
Film: Kodak Portra 160
Exposure: About four minutes (guessed it and was slightly off)

Recently we went camping in Reliance on the banks of the the Hiwassee River. It’s quiet and at night it’s dark…except for this damn light on a vacation home across the river from where we stayed. I swear stadium lights produce less pollution than this thing. The frustrating part, nobody was home so the light wasn’t necessary (although it would aid anyone breaking in). The only positive I saw…was how it lit this tree.

I’m really wondering if I need to check my scanner settings. It seems I’m getting some seriously oversaturated colors. I had to desaturate this one in PS.

Photo
Nikkormat: Concurring Contrast on Flickr.Left: Nikon Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative
Right:Nikon Nikkor-Q 200mm f/4, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive
My favorite tree in our back yard. These were shot within minutes of each other at sunset. I toned down the overwhelming cross-process red in the left image.

Nikkormat: Concurring Contrast on Flickr.

Left: Nikon Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative
Right:Nikon Nikkor-Q 200mm f/4, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive

My favorite tree in our back yard. These were shot within minutes of each other at sunset. I toned down the overwhelming cross-process red in the left image.

Photo
Nikkormat FTN: ▲▲ on Flickr.Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative. All manual (no light meter) and basic darkroom edits (burn, dodge, etc.).

Nikkormat FTN: ▲▲ on Flickr.

Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative. All manual (no light meter) and basic darkroom edits (burn, dodge, etc.).

Photo
Nikkormat: Unrestrained (Scanned as Negative) on Flickr.Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as negetives (which means they don’t need to be inverted). For consistency, I auto-corrected color and contrast and used the “lighter” setting in curves on each image layer using Photoshop.
I’m experimenting with cross process, or rather, how to scan cross processed film. I used to have the lab do my scans but it was getting too expensive. I purchased an Epson v500 second hand (the best photo purchase I’ve made in years). My first roll of cross process I scanned as positive and wondered the reds and pinks that denote typical “cross process” were missing. It wasn’t until my next film that I scanned as negative…and viola, the cross process look. That really started me thinking about what I knew about cross process and how to best approach each film (actually, each frame). 
It’s difficult to figure out how to scan to get the best final result. Scanning is a time consuming process so I really don’t want to scan everything twice just to figure it out. Hence, my tedious experiment (and its description here). I’m hope to find common markers or elements that clue me into how to best scan. So far, no luck. 
In the case of this triptych — all images that were well exposed in full sun — the negative scans were dark but the positive scans turned out well. I’ve had similar images where the negative scans were perfect but positive scans were dark. 
Arghhhh. I wonder if the length of the exposure affects anything. Do the longer exposures of pinhole do something to the film chemistry? If you have answers, please, please, clue me in :)

Nikkormat: Unrestrained (Scanned as Negative) on Flickr.

Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as negetives (which means they don’t need to be inverted). For consistency, I auto-corrected color and contrast and used the “lighter” setting in curves on each image layer using Photoshop.

I’m experimenting with cross process, or rather, how to scan cross processed film. I used to have the lab do my scans but it was getting too expensive. I purchased an Epson v500 second hand (the best photo purchase I’ve made in years). My first roll of cross process I scanned as positive and wondered the reds and pinks that denote typical “cross process” were missing. It wasn’t until my next film that I scanned as negative…and viola, the cross process look. That really started me thinking about what I knew about cross process and how to best approach each film (actually, each frame).

It’s difficult to figure out how to scan to get the best final result. Scanning is a time consuming process so I really don’t want to scan everything twice just to figure it out. Hence, my tedious experiment (and its description here). I’m hope to find common markers or elements that clue me into how to best scan. So far, no luck.

In the case of this triptych — all images that were well exposed in full sun — the negative scans were dark but the positive scans turned out well. I’ve had similar images where the negative scans were perfect but positive scans were dark.

Arghhhh. I wonder if the length of the exposure affects anything. Do the longer exposures of pinhole do something to the film chemistry? If you have answers, please, please, clue me in :)

Photo
Nikkormat: Confined Triptych on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive and inverted in PS

Nikkormat: Confined Triptych on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Nikkormat FTN, Nikon 28mm f/2 AI, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a positive and inverted in PS

Photo
Diptych: Imperial House Duel on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Dueling cameras and films:
Left: Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8 Lens, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative, toned (down…it was red like Mars) in PS
Right: Zero Image 69 pinhole, f235, Kodak Portra 400, ~ 20 seconds

Diptych: Imperial House Duel on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Dueling cameras and films:
Left: Nikkormat FTN, Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8 Lens, Fujichrome Velvia 100, cross processed, scanned as a negative, toned (down…it was red like Mars) in PS
Right: Zero Image 69 pinhole, f235, Kodak Portra 400, ~ 20 seconds